THE TYPES / STAGES OF BREASTMILK

Your breasts will produce 3 types of milk during your breastfeeding journey, or rather, your breastmilk will go through 3 stages.

Your baby needs both foremilk and hindmilk for optimal growth and development, therefore it is crucial to keep baby on one breast long enough for her to receive both.

The first milk you will produce is colostrum;
Colostrum production can start at any time during your pregnancy, often towards the end of your pregnancy or it can start as soon as the placenta is delivered. Your body knows that your baby's stomach is very tiny to begin with, having the capacity of 5 to 7ml (that is one teaspoon!), so your body creates this "super-milk" packed full of nutrients to feed your baby the first few days of life.

Colostrum is easy for your baby's stomach to digest and is the perfect first food for your baby. It is thick and sticky, often resembling condense milk, one teaspoon of colostrum equals a full feed of mature milk your baby will drink later in life.

The second and third types of milk you will find in your breasts are foremilk and hindmilk.
This is the "mature" milk that usually comes in around days 3 to 5 after delivery. This is also the milk you will continue to produce until your baby weans (stops drinking breastmilk)
.
Foremilk is what your baby receives at the beginning of a feed, it is often lighter in color and looks very watery and thin. It is thirst quenching, containing plenty of lactose and proteins but very little fat and few calories, it will therefore quickly quench baby's thirst but will not keep him full for long.

Hindmilk comes at the end of the feed, as it is thicker due to its high fat content causing it to travel down your alveoli (where the milk is made) much slower. As your breasts produce milk, the fat gathers in the alveoli, causing a build up. The hind milk contains more fat and calories, thus keeping baby full for longer.

Your baby needs both foremilk and hindmilk for optimal growth and development, therefore it is crucial to keep baby on one breast long enough for her to receive both.

Additional Information:

http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/basics/foremilk-hindmilk/
http://www.llli.org/faq/foremilk.html